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Feb
14
Chocolate Covered Exploit?
Posted by Devi on 14 February 2012 05:40 AM

Valentine’s Day is here, and stores are flooded with flowers, chocolates, and gift cards. Showing appreciation to your significant other(s) with a box of expensive chocolates has become a tradition, but Googling to find the perfect gourmet chocolate gift has never been more dangerous.

 

Events such as Valentine’s Day are a prime target for many hackers. Because large numbers of people search using similar terms—in this case, “Valentine’s Day chocolates”—hackers can drive a lot of traffic to a site in a short period of time. In the first three pages of results, you can stumble across an apparently harmless site leading to potential exploits and malware that could have a catastrophic effect on the computer.

 

At first glance, the site below seems harmless. When we take a closer look at its source code, however, we see an interesting iframe.

 

 

The source code shows an iframe in the top left corner of the page.

 

On the surface, the source code of the URL http://bigdeal777.com/gate.php?f=956993 seems to have no content, but when we review the site using internal Websense mining tools, we find that the source code actually contains an exploit kit that uses several PC vulnerabilities to push malware onto the system.

 

Websense customers are protected from these threats by ACETM, our Advanced Classification Engine.


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